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Virtual Tech

3 Snapshots of Virtual Tech You May Want To Know About

July 2, 2014 • Guys n Geeks, News, Second Life, Tech & Gadgets

Virtual Tech News

As VR and Virtual Worlds increase pace and popularity, it’s useful to get a peek at what’s happening today. So Today we’re headed into a world full of virtual tech; military, robotics, immersive, new virtual worlds and free stuff. We take a brief look at some of them here.

1. Codename “Blueshark”

The public are being invited to take a look at the latest virtual tech for developing and using US warships. Does this mean that in the future we will have ‘drone ships’ as well as ‘drone planes’?

I would think so. Imagine the US getting into a risk-free war – that is risk-free to their own forces.

The University of Southern California has produced this and many other military based virtual tech products through it’s MxR arm. It was curious to see that all these products contain avatars dressed in military uniforms.

It may not be to much of a leap of faith to suggest that the US Military is funding these virtual tech projects. It may not be too much of a leap of faith either to speculate that they are intended for warfare. To quote the USC Institure for Creative Technologies web site “The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), is responsible for funding and developing blue sky advancements in technology and science for the US Department of Defense.” Worth a look at research being funded by DARPA.

2. Virtual Tech Gadget To See Yourself in Real Life As If in A Virtual World

This is a great gadget for Oculus Rift owners. Seeing yourself in third-person perspective (TPP) in the real world,  is a cool piece of virtual tech! It’s a virtual whirl. This home made Wall-E style add on for Rift looks like a lot of fun to build and could be a novel way to experience the world.


This is a fun find rather than  anything serioous… and you can make it out of bits and bolts lying around your home and in your computer.

3. Virtual Tech Helps Breaking Bad Turn To Being Good

The study, “Being Bad in a Video Game Can Make Us More Morally Sensitive,” was published online in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking.

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Matthew Grizzard

According to Matthew Grizzard, PhD, assistant professor in the University at Buffalo Department of Communication, guilt provoked in games from ‘bad behaviour’ increased the sense of moral judgement in the participants. So if a gameplayer has done something morally wrong in the game, like shooting a friend in the back, the emotional experience they feel will make them think twice about doing it in the real world.

Grizzard explains that in life and in game, specific definitions of moral behaviour in each domain will vary from culture to culture and situation to situation.

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Violent Game Play

“For instance,” he says, “an American who played a violent game ‘as a terrorist’ would likely consider his avatar’s unjust and violent behaviour — violations of the fairness/reciprocity and harm/care domains — to be more immoral than when he or she performed the same acts in the role of a ‘UN peacekeeper.’”

Maybe there’s hope for us yet?

For more on this study, See: http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2014/06/037.html

 

Grizzard explains that in life and in game, specific definitions of moral behavior in each domain will vary from culture to culture and situation to situation.

“For instance,” he says, “an American who played a violent game ‘as a terrorist’ would likely consider his avatar’s unjust and violent behavior — violations of the fairness/reciprocity and harm/care domains — to be more immoral than when he or she performed the same acts in the role of a ‘UN peacekeeper.’”

– See more at: http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2014/06/037.html#sthash.vvmKKP0w.dpuf

Grizzard explains that in life and in game, specific definitions of moral behavior in each domain will vary from culture to culture and situation to situation.

“For instance,” he says, “an American who played a violent game ‘as a terrorist’ would likely consider his avatar’s unjust and violent behavior — violations of the fairness/reciprocity and harm/care domains — to be more immoral than when he or she performed the same acts in the role of a ‘UN peacekeeper.’”

– See more at: http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2014/06/037.html#sthash.vvmKKP0w.dpuf

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